Ramsey, Sir Bertram Home

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Ramsey, Sir Bertram Home, born 20-01-1883, in London, into an old Scottish family, see Ramsay Baronets and attended the Colchester Royal Grammar School. In 1898, he joined the Royal Navy  . Serving on HMS Britannia, he became an midshipman within a year. Following his promotion, he was transferred to HMS Crescent. During World War I he was assigned his first command, the “M 25”, a small monitor, in August 1915. For two years his ship was part of the Dover Patrol off the Belgian coast. On October 1917 he took command of another Dover Patrol vessel, the destroyer HMS Broke. On 09-05-1918, his ship took part in the Second Ostend Raid, a follow up to the Zeebrugge Raid, and he was mentioned in dispatches. Resigning from the Navy in 1938, he was coaxed out of retirement by Winston Churchill

   one year later to help deal with the Axis threat. As Vice-Admiral Dover he was responsible for the Dunkirk evacuation, code named Operation Dynamo. Working from the underground tunnels beneath Dover Castle, he and his staff worked for nine days straight to rescue troops trapped in France by the   German forces. For his success in bringing home 338,226 British and Allied soldiers from the beaches of Dunkirk, he was asked to personally report on the operation to the King Georg VI and was made a Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath . Ramsay was to be appointed as Naval Force Commander for the invasion of Europe on 29-04-1942, but the invasion was postponed and he was transferred to become deputy Naval Commander of the Allied invasion of North Africa.  Under the Allied Naval Commander of the Expeditionary Force, Sir Andrew Cunningham Cunningham died age 80, on 12-07-1963, buried at sea.

Death and burial ground of Ramsey, Sir Bertram Home.

  Ramsay planned the landing efforts. During the Allied invasion of Sicily in July 1943, he was Naval Commanding Officer, Eastern Task Force and prepared the amphibious landings. Although the men fighting on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day richly deserve the attention given to their efforts, the job of the naval forces was also of vital importance. In 1944, Ramsay was appointed Naval Commander in Chief of the Allied Naval Expeditionary Force for the invasion.  On 02-01-1945, age 61, he was killed when his plane crashed on takeoff at Toussus-le-Noble, southwest of Paris. He was en route to a conference with Field Marshal, Bernard Montgomery in Brussels. Ramsey is buried on the cemetery of St. Germain en Laye, near Paris.

   

 

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